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Ministry of Healing - Ellen White and Health

I can't possibly list all the sources and references to substantiate this amazing book. I have found hundreds of scientific studies and articles that confirm the statements from this health reform expert.

You can download this amazing book "Ministry of Health" free here.

There are just a few scientific confirmations of statements Ellen White wrote from "Proof Positive" by Dr. Nedley, MD. Used with permission.

"She wrote volumes on topics related to health, healing, and lifestyle. Ministry of Healing, Counsels on Diet and Foods, Medical Ministry, and Counsels on Health are four books that contain information and advice on a wide variety of diseases and conditions. These books and others have undergone many printings over the decades and are still available and in demand today. As a physician, I have been amazed as to the validity and usefulness of her admonitions regarding health principles and treatments for disease.

A century ago she laid out a formula for personal healthful living in the areas of diet, exercise, temperance, rest, sunshine, hydrotherapy, and fresh air that is still valid today. However, it is only within the last 30 years that most of her recommendations, cautions, and warnings have been scientifically verified, and none have been refuted. Most of her admonitions had no scientific support during her lifetime and thus were not largely accepted by the medical community; some were in direct contradiction to common medical knowledge and practice of her day.

For example, in her day, tobacco was thought to be useful as a medication for the relief of the symptoms of asthma. Some medical associations actually recommended it for this and other breathing disorders.

Shortly before her day, George Washington was bled to death in an attempt to cure him of a disease. Medical doctors administered other treatments that we now know are damaging rather than curative. He was given heavy metals; he was actually poisoned; he was scalded in order to "let the toxins out of his body." These treatments were accurately recorded, not to show the ignorance of the physicians, but to indicate that they applied all of the known medical treatment in an attempt to bring him back to health."

Insights on the Devastating Effects of Tobacco Use

It was in this medical climate that Ellen White wrote that tobacco is a stimulant and a depressant.  She warned that tobacco causes cancer, heart disease, and other health problems.  She cautioned that it also inflicts damage to the mind, which has just very recently been proven.  She wrote of its addictiveness, which has now been proven and is widely recognized, even by the tobacco companies.  As late as the 1950s, the position of the American Medical Association regarding tobacco was that its benefits outweigh its harm.1 

The format used in this survey of her writings highlights an underlined topic, shows Ellen White's words, and compares them to statements from medical science.  A few observations on the subject of tobacco made by her and her modern medical science counterparts follow.

Nicotine Affects the Nervous System

Ellen White's Words: "Tobacco...excites [stimulates]and then paralyzes [suppresses] the nerves."2

Medical Science Speaks: A medical textbook on smoking says: "Nicotine is a cholinergic agonist [a stimulant] at low doses and an antagonist [a suppressor] at high doses."3 

The Addictive Power Of Tobacco

Ellen White's Words: "Tobacco …chains the will; it holds its victims in the slavery of habits difficult to overcome…" 4

Medical Science Speaks:

•             Nicotine is six to eight times more addictive than alcohol.5, 6 

•             Intravenous nicotine gave scores 5 to 10 times higher than even intravenous cocaine.7

Tobacco as a Gateway Drug

Ellen White's Words: The "appetite for tobacco is self-destructive.  It leads to a craving for something stronger,—fermented wines and liquors, all of which are intoxicating."8

Medical Science Speaks:

•             Children who use tobacco are more likely to go on to use in sequence alcohol, marijuana, and then other illegal drugs.9

•             The more children and adults smoke, the more alcohol and other drugs they tend to use.10 

Tobacco's Far-reaching Health Effects

Ellen White's Words: "Suffering, disease, and death are the sure penalty of indulgence [in tobacco and alcohol]."11

Medical Science Speaks:

•             All told, more than 400,000 Americans die each year from smoking.12

•             One quarter or more of all smokers in our country die prematurely from a smoking induced illness with an average loss of life of 21 years.13

•             Worldwide smoking claims over 3 million lives annually.14 

Smoking And Cancer

Ellen White's Words: White described tobacco as a "malignant" poison in her published writings throughout four decades.

Medical Science Speaks:

•             Smoking increases the risk of cancers of the lung, lip, mouth (oral cavity), throat (pharynx), voice box (larynx), trachea (wind pipe), esophagus, stomach, liver, pancreas, bladder, kidney, cervix, blood (leukemia), colon, skin, and penis.15, 16, 17, 18, 19 

•             Nearly one third of all cancer deaths in our nation are due to smoking.20

Tobacco: A Slow, Insidious Carcinogen

Ellen White's Words: "Tobacco is a slow, insidious, but most malignant poison…it is all the more dangerous because its effects are slow and at first hardly perceptible."21

Medical Science Speaks: This fact is well known today.  Its slowness required many years of large statistical studies to determine that it causes cancer and other diseases. 

Youth and Tobacco

Ellen White's Words: "Boys begin the use of tobacco at a very early age.  The habit thus formed, when body and mind are especially susceptible to its effects, undermines the physical strength..."22

Medical Science Speaks: In both men and women, the earlier a person starts smoking, the greater the susceptibility to lung cancer.  For example, women who started smoking before age 18 had nearly double the lung cancer risk of those who started between the ages of 21 and 34—and nearly seven times the risk of women who picked up the smoking habit when 35 or older.23

Smoking and Heart Disease

Ellen White's Words: "Lately I have read … of the death of many men…Their death is almost always attributed to failure of the heart, but in reality … the use of tobacco and liquor had poisoned the system [of many of them]…"24 

Medical Science Speaks: Each year in America as many as 300,000 cardiovascular disease deaths are the direct result of cigarette smoking.25, 26, 27

Smoking Affects the Blood

Ellen White's Words: "Tobacco… poisons the life current"28 "…many chew and smoke [tobacco] until the blood is corrupted…"29

Medical Science Speaks:

•             Smoking accelerates atherosclerosis by causing several changes in the blood.  In lay language there would probably be no better way to describe those changes as "smoking poisons the blood." It decreases levels of a clot-preventing compound called prostacyclin.30, 31, 32 

•             It increases blood levels of carbon monoxide and stress hormones, both of which damage blood vessels;33, 34 it elevates fibrinogen, a blood constituent that increases the risk of atherosclerosis and clotting.35

•             It raises blood levels of LDL and lowers HDL.

Smoking Damages the Brain

Ellen White's Words: Tobacco weakens the brain and paralyzes its fine sensibilities;"36 it "beclouds the brain."37

Medical Science Speaks:

•             Smokers are less able to perform complex mental tasks than non-smokers.38

•             Using as few as 1 to 14 cigarettes per day can more than double the risk of nonfatal stroke,39 which can damage our highest mental and moral functioning. 

No Safe Form Of Tobacco

Ellen White's Words: "Tobacco, in whatever form it is used, tells upon the constitution. It is a slow poison."40

Medical Science Speaks:

1.            Mortality rates of cigar and pipe smokers are 20 to 40 percent higher than rates for nonsmokers.41 

2.            One reason is that cigar and pipe users have a significantly increased risk of heart disease death.42 

3.            Chew or dipping smokeless tobacco is a potent cancer risk factor.43

4.            There are 28 different cancer-causing chemicals in chewing tobacco and snuff.44

Did Ellen White understand the dangers of secondhand smoke?  Her insights are clearly documented.

Dangers of Secondhand Smoke

Ellen White's words: "…by using tobacco, [smokers] poison the Lord's free atmosphere, so that others are injured."45  She referred to the air in a room with smokers as "tobacco-poisoned air."46 

Medical Science Speaks: Deaths in the U.S. per year from secondhand smoke is estimated at 50,000.47  

Children of Smoking Parents are Damaged

Ellen White's Words: Smoking parents cause "the system of the infant [to be] filled with poison...it acts upon some infants… causing spasms, fits, paralysis, and sudden death."48

Medical Science Speaks:

•             When compared to the babies of nonsmokers, infants whose mothers smoked both during pregnancy and after are three times more likely to become victims of SIDS—the "sudden infant death syndrome."49 

•             Smoking fathers also increase their infants' risks of SIDS.50

Mental Damage to Children from Secondhand Smoke

Ellen White's Words: "Mental inability and physical weakness can result from parental smoking;"51 "unborn generations are afflicted by the [parental] use of tobacco and liquor.  Intellectual decay is entailed upon them, and their moral perceptions are blunted."

Medical Science Speaks:

•             Maternal smoking actually decreases the number of brain nerve cells in the developing fetus.52

•             Intelligence quotients (IQs) were an average of nine points lower among 3 to 4 year old children whose mothers smoked during pregnancy.53

•             Other secondhand smoke effects include difficulty in processing sound, and dealing with three-dimensional geometry concepts.54, 55

Summing up Ellen White on Tobacco

Ellen White did indeed bless the world with accurate scientific insights into the dangers of tobacco.  In addition to the benefits to millions of readers of her books, she gave all nations another precious legacy: she encouraged Seventh-day Adventists to devote energy to help smokers kick the habit.  Her philosophy is perhaps best summarized in her own words: "Work for the intemperate man and the tobacco user…"56

Following White's counsel, Seventh-day Adventists have conducted one of the world's most successful stop-smoking programs.  Since its inception in the 50s, their "Five Day Plan to Stop Smoking,"57 has been used by an estimated 14 million smokers in 150 different countries.  The program is still used today, sometimes in a revised form known as "The Breathe Free Plan to Stop Smoking."  Modern research shows just what Ellen White taught a century ago: tobacco is not just a killer.  It can steal life's quality, destroy happiness, induce disability, and rob billions of dollars from society.  Our country and the world would be far different today if everyone had heeded White's words when she first penned them.

Insights on the Superiority of the Pure Vegetarian Diet.

One of White's most tireless recommendations was the health benefits of the vegetarian diet.  In literally hundreds of places in her writings she upheld this diet as the ideal.

Vegetarianism was little known in the 1800s; the meaning of the term itself was not generally understood.  Vitamins had not yet been discovered, and the existence of bacteria was just being discovered.  The circulation of the blood had recently been discovered.  Modern scientific discoveries have established that heart disease, cancer, and many other diseases have their origins in the meat itself.  Her understanding of the role of diet in regard to health is astounding in light of the prevailing, primitive medical knowledge of her day.

She had much to say about other factors relating to diet and eating habits.  Let us look at a few of her pronouncements on diet that have been verified by modern medical science. 

Vegetarian Diet is the Most Healthful

Ellen White's Words: "Grains, fruits, nuts, and vegetables constitute the diet chosen for us by our Creator.  These foods prepared in as simple and natural a manner as possible, are the most healthful and nourishing." 58 

Medical Science Speaks: Statistical studies combined with increased scientific knowledge of the immune system and the action on the body of dietary fiber, carbohydrates, cholesterol, protein, phytochemi-cals, vitamins, antioxidants, salt, and many other substances in foods, have proven the superiority of the vegetarian diet.  The diet has been shown to be beneficial in the prevention and treatment of many diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, stroke, heart disease, cancer, diabetes, cataracts, urinary infections, asthma, kidney failure, kidney stones, serious infectious illnesses, and mental health.  Vegetarians have been shown to have greater longevity, superior muscular endurance, less chronic diseases, less utilization of health care facilities including hospitals, and less need for medications.

The benefits of the vegetarian diet are now found on the pages of even the most conservative scientific publications.  Throughout this book I have presented much of the accumulated evidence that remarkably indicates the superiority of the vegetarian diet which Ellen White advocated 125 years ago.  Information on how this eating style is helpful in preventing or treating heart disease is found in Chapter 3 on heart disease and Chapter 4 on reversing heart disease.  The vegetarian diet also receives considerable attention in Chapter 2 on cancer.  Chapter 8 on sugar and diabetes shows some of the advantages of a diet free of animal products on this leading disease.  Benefits of the vegetarian fare in the context of conditions like asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, cataracts, and others are found in the final chapter.

More Admonitions Regarding the Vegetarian Diet

Vegetarian Diet Enhances Physical Endurance

Ellen White's Words: Grains, fruits, nuts, and vegetables constitute the diet chosen for us by our Creator…They impart a strength, a power of endurance, and a vigor of intellect, that are not afforded by a more complex and stimulating diet.59 "… [Individuals] will have greater powers of endurance if they abstain from meat than if they subsist largely upon it."60 "It is a mistake to suppose that muscular strength depends on the use of animal food."61

Medical Science Speaks:

•             Bicycle tests of athletes who follow a high fat, high protein, high meat diet, can triple their endurance by switching to a vegetarian type of high carbohydrate diet.62 

•             Marathon runners among many others have discovered that meat is a detriment to distance running or other endurance activities.

•             The belief that a diet strong in meat is essential for people that do muscular work has been prevalent up to just a few years ago.

Vegetarian Diet Enhances Mental Performance

Ellen White's Words: Grains, fruits, nuts, and vegetables… impart a vigor of intellect, that [is] not afforded by a more complex and stimulating diet.63

Medical Science Speaks:

1. Meat contains a substance that impairs brain activity and lacks a substance that the brain needs to function well.  Arachidonic acid found in meat impairs optimal functioning of the brain center for wisdom, judgment and foresight—the frontal lobe.64, 65, 66, 67

2. Animal foods are devoid of carbohydrate, which is the primary source of energy that the brain can use,68 but a vegetarian diet contains a plentiful supply.

Meat Increases the Risk of Infectious Diseases

Ellen White's Words: "…the liability to take disease is increased ten-fold by meat eating." 69

Medical Science Speaks:

•             Infectious agents transmitted especially from animal products include salmonella,70, 71 listeria,72, 73 campylobacter, 74, 75, 76 and dangerous varieties of E. coli (technically referred to as serotypes O157:H7 and O104:H21).77, 78, 79, 80 

•             Although these agents often cause nothing more than severe diarrhea, they can cause blood infections (sepsis), permanent arthritis, nervous system disease, kidney failure, and fatalities. 

•             Foods commonly associated with one or more of these illnesses are soft cheeses,81 other dairy products (including pasteurized items),82, 83, 84 eggs,85, 86 sausage, 87 beef products, 88 undercooked chicken,89, 90 and "non-reheated hot dogs."91

The Vegetarian Diet and Infectious Diseases

Ellen White's Words: "We see that cattle are becoming greatly diseased…and we know that the time will come when it will not be best to use milk and eggs. 92  Even while sanctioning the use of dairy products in her day, White wrote: "If milk is used, it should be thoroughly sterilized; with this precaution, there is less danger of contracting disease from its use."93 

Medical Science Speaks:

•             Even today's pasteurized milk is contaminated.  Thorough sterilization (boiling the milk) would have clearly prevented outbreaks of salmonella and listeria. 

•             Crohn's disease (a serious, and sometimes life threatening intestinal illness) may also be linked to milk.  Even pasteurized milk94 may contain mycobacterium paratuberculosis95, 96 which may cause Crohn's in susceptible individuals.

Animal Products, Infection, and Cancer.

Ellen White's Words: "Flesh was never the best food; but its use is now doubly objectionable, since disease in animals is so rapidly increasing…People are continually eating flesh that is filled with…cancerous germs.97

Medical Science Speaks:

•             The medical literature does not yet show a definite link between animal infectious illness and human cancer.  However, there is growing cause for concern.  Animal diseases can either cause cancer or immune system changes in infected animals.  The bovine leukemia virus causes a form of leukemia in American cattle.98, 99 

•             An animal form of AIDS called the bovine immunodeficiency virus100, 101 affects cattle.

Cancer from Eating Animal Products.

Ellen White's Words: "[animal] flesh… is filled with…cancerous germs.102

Medical Science Speaks:

•             American women who eat the most red meat double their risk of lymphoma.103  Eating hamburgers more than four times per week more than doubles a woman's risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.104

•             Meat eating may also increase a host of other cancers.  It more than doubles the risk of colon cancer.105, 106, 107, 108, 109 

When it comes to cancer, proof that the presence of cancerous "germs" in animals directly causes cancer has not yet been established, but medical evidence raises the question.  We do know that certain cancers are caused by bacteria, and certain other cancers are caused by eating meat.  It is well established that chronic bacterial infections such as Helicobacter Pylori can cause cancer of the stomach and have been linked to lymphoma.110  It is now well documented that many cancers are caused by a virus and that certain viruses can be transmitted from animals to humans.  It is not surprising that some of White's uncanny insights have not yet been confirmed by modern science.  Most of her counsels were not "medically proven" until many years after they were written.

White made the connection between diet, disease, and death: "Many die of diseases wholly due to meat eating, when the real cause is scarcely suspected by themselves or others.  Some do not immediately feel its effects, but this is no evidence that it does not hurt them.  It may be doing its work surely upon the system, yet for the time being the victim may realize nothing of it."111

Fish are not Safe to Eat

Ellen White's Words: "The fish that partake of the filthy sewerage… may pass into waters far distant from the sewerage, and be caught in localities where the water is pure and fresh; but because of the unwholesome drainage in which they have been feeding, they are not safe to eat."112

Medical Science Speaks:

•             In 1996, 47 of our 50 states had consumption advisories warning about eating certain species of fish.  The advisories covered 1,740 rivers and lakes (including all of the Great Lakes) and large chunks of coastal areas.113

•             Each year in the U.S. there are over 100,000 reported cases of  food poisoning due to contaminated seafood.114

•             Seafood causes as many as 15 times as many food poisoning outbreaks as beef, poultry, or pork.115 

•             Raw shellfish pose the greatest risk.116  They are commonly harvested from coastal waters that have been contaminated with human sewage.

Fish are not Safe to Eat

Ellen White's Words: "In many localities even fish is unwholesome, and ought not to be used…they are not safe to eat."117

Medical Science Speaks:

•             National Cancer Institute data show an increased death rate from cancer among people living in areas where fish have exceptionally large amounts of tumors.118

•             Lake Erie sediments caused skin cancer when painted onto the skin of mice.119

•             It is common to find fish contaminated by with halogenated organic compounds (including DDT).120, 121

•             Elevated levels of halogenated hydrocarbons have been found in the tissue of breast cancer patients, suggesting a cause-and-effect relationship.122 

Fish are not Safe to Eat

Ellen White's Words: "In many localities even fish is unwholesome, and ought not to be used…they are not safe to eat."123

Medical Science Speaks:

•             In the U.S., fish products contain significantly more pesticide residues than fruits, grains, or vegetables.124

•             Many fish are contaminated with PCBs, dioxin, heavy metals, and halogenated organic compounds (including DDT).125, 126, 127

•             Halogenated organic compounds, PCBs, and dioxins may increase the risk of a variety of conditions such as high blood pressure, arteriosclerosis, diabetes, and elevated blood fats.128, 129

•             Fetal PCB exposure may cause nervous system damage and long-lasting mental impairment.130, 131

In addition to promoting vegetarianism, Ellen White often singled out particular foods or food categories because of their unique effects on health.  Sometimes those effects were detrimental, other times they were beneficial.132  She commented on foods that we now know have a bearing on heart disease.

Heart Disease Concerns with Cheese

Ellen White's Words: "Cheese is … wholly unfit for food."133

Medical Science Speaks:

•             Oxidized cholesterol increases heart disease risk.134, 135 

•             Ripened cheese is a top source of this oxidized cholesterol.136

•             Cheese tends to be high in salt.  In susceptible people, this will raise blood pressure (another heart disease risk factor).

•             Many cheeses are high in saturated fat, which tends to raise blood cholesterol values.

Custards and Heart Health

Ellen White's Words: "Especially harmful are the custards and puddings in which milk, eggs, and sugar are the chief ingredients."137

Medical Science Speaks:

•             Dried custard mix (which typically contains sugar, milk, and eggs) is one of the worst offenders when it comes to containing oxidized cholesterol and producing measurable damage to blood vessel lining cells.138

•             The destruction caused by oxidized cholesterol appears to be a key factor in causing hardening of the arteries and ultimately heart attacks.139, 140

Nuts and Heart Health

Ellen White's Words: "Nuts and nut foods are coming largely into use to take the place of flesh meats.  With nuts may be combined grains, fruits, and some roots, to make foods that are healthful and nourishing."141

Medical Science Speaks:

•             Just when many heart disease researchers were about to cross nuts off the list of "healthful foods" (due to their high fat content), researchers at Loma Linda University found that nuts could lower blood cholesterol levels and provide a corresponding decrease in the risk of heart disease.142, 143 

Nut Varieties and Heart Disease

Ellen White's Words:"…some nuts are not so wholesome as others.  Almonds are preferable to peanuts..." 144

Medical Science Speaks:

•             Peanut fat has a specific chemical structure that makes it harder on human arteries.145 From this perspective, almonds (and a variety of other nuts) are superior to peanuts. 

•             Almonds boast more vitamin E than almost all other nuts.  Intake of the antioxidant vitamin E is associated with a decreased risk of heart disease.146

The Importance of Fiber

Ellen White's Words: "For use in bread-making, the superfine white flour is not the best...Fine-flour bread is lacking in nutritive elements to be found in bread made from the whole wheat.  It is a frequent cause of constipation and other unhealthful conditions."147

Medical Science Speaks: Whole grain outdoes white flour in a host of nutrient comparisons.  For example, white bread has virtually no fiber; whole grain bread is a good source.  Fiber appears able to decrease risk of a host of diseases including heart disease, cancer, constipation, appendicitis, and varicose veins.148, 149, 150, 151

Benefits from the Allium Family: Garlic And Onions

Ellen White's Words: "There is great virtue in well-cooked onions."152

Medical Science Speaks: Dr. Ben Lau in his book, "The Health Benefits of Garlic," lists a number of benefits from this food family.  Garlic seems to help with elevated blood pressure, high cholesterol, and infections caused by both bacteria and yeasts.  Onions often help these conditions as well, due to chemical similarities in these plants.153

Dangers of Fat in the Diet

Another area where modern science has come around to agree squarely with Ellen White is on the position of dramatically decreasing fat—and specifically saturated fat—in our diet.  This is important for both heart disease and cancer prevention.  In White's day, however, no one was talking about "saturated fat."  Instead, they used the word "grease" to designate the main category of saturated fats—those from animal sources.  I devote considerable attention in this volume to issues dealing with animal fats (see, for example, Chapter 2 andChapter 3).  Some of White's statements that are in harmony with this now well-accepted scientific dictum follow.

Ellen White Condemned High Saturated Fat Foods

1.  "…prepare food properly.  This can be done in a simple, healthful, and easy manner, without the use of lard, butter, or flesh meats."154 

2.  "We do not think fried potatoes are healthful, for there is more or less grease or butter used in preparing them."155 

3.  "You should keep grease out of your food.  It defiles any preparation of food you may make."

Ellen White, Sugar, and Cancer

In addition to focusing attention on animal products and saturated fats, Ellen White provided other insights that may have a bearing on cancer prevention.  For example, one sobering linkage involves sugar and cancer. 

Warnings Against Sugar

Ellen White's Words: "From the light given me, sugar, when largely used, is more injurious than meat."156

Medical Science Speaks: A number of different cancers have now been statistically linked to sugar consumption.  The risk of the following cancers appears to rise when more sugar is consumed: colon cancer, rectal cancer, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, uterine cancer, prostate cancer, kidney cancer, and cancers of the nervous system.157

Coffee is Hurtful

Ellen White's Words: Coffee is a hurtful indulgence.  It temporarily excites the mind…, but the aftereffect is exhaustion, prostration, paralysis of the mental, moral, and physical powers."158  Tea acts as a stimulant...The action of coffee…is similar.  Fatigue is forgotten, the strength seems to be increased...when the influence of the stimulant is gone, the unnatural force abates, and the result is a corresponding degree of languor and disability.159

Medical Science Speaks:

•             The internationally acclaimed Norwegian research project known as the Tromso heart study assessed 143,000 men and women and found a significant increase in depression in women who were heavy coffee users.160 

•             Caffeine addictiveness has only recently been proven at John Hopkins University.  Researchers at Johns Hopkins published startling research that demonstrated that "caffeine has the cardinal features of a prototypic drug of abuse."161  Based on its drug effects, caffeine acts much like any classic addictive drug.  The implication is that habitual caffeine users are as much drug addicts, in the chemical sense of the term, as cocaine addicts, heroin addicts, or nicotine addicts. 

•             She warned of its effect on the mind, which also has only recently been proven.

Insights on Eating Habits

The Importance of Breakfast

Ellen White's Words:"The habit of eating a sparing breakfast and a large dinner is wrong.  Make your breakfast correspond more nearly to the heartiest meal of the day."162

Medical Science Speaks:

•             Eating breakfast appears to be essential for maximum mental and physical efficiency.163

•             Regular breakfast eaters may be able to cut their risk of death in half.164, 165 

•             A good breakfast and a lighter (or no) supper may help improve blood sugar control in diabetics.

Fewer Meals and No Snacking

Ellen White's Words: "In most cases two meals a day are preferable to three."166  "Three meals a day and nothing between meals—not even an apple—should be the utmost limit of indulgence."167 

Medical Science Speaks:

•             The more frequently a person eats, the greater his or her risk of colon cancer.168, 169, 170

•             The original Alameda County Study data identified "no snacking" as a health habit associated with longevity.

Heavy Suppers Stymie Weight Loss

Ellen White's Words: "the last meal [supper] is generally the most hearty, and is often taken just before retiring.  This is reversing the natural order; a hearty meal should never be taken so late in the day."171

Medical Science Speaks: Leaving off supper may be one of the best ways to deal with excess weight.  One study documented weight loss in all of nearly 600 patients who ate their last meal no later than 3:00 p.m.172

Benefits of Fasting

Ellen White's Words: "In many cases of sickness, the very best remedy is for the patient to fast for a meal or two….  Many times a short period of entire abstinence from food, followed by simple, moderate eating, has led to recovery through nature's own recuperative effort…."173

Medical Science Speaks:

•             A short fast may improve immune functioning.

•             Restricting certain essential amino acids such as phenylalanine and tyrosine may play a role in cancer treatment.

Ellen White also singled out many other factors besides diet and addictive substances that can have a substantial affect on health.  The following is a very small sampling.  For additional extensive commentary on lifestyle and health, you may be interested in acquiring one or more of the books mentioned at the beginning of this commentary.

Fresh Air Enhances Mental Clarity

Ellen White's Words: "In the construction of buildings… care should be taken to provide for good ventilation and plenty of sunlight….  Neglect of proper ventilation is responsible for much…drowsiness and dullness."174

Medical Science Speaks: Fresh air is chemically superior to re-circulated indoor air.175  High quality fresh air is actually electrified and gives rise to a number of benefits including:

•             Improved sense of well being.

•             Mild tranquilization and relaxation (decreased anxiety).

•             Improved learning in mammals.176, 177, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182

Health Risks of City Dwelling

Ellen White's Words: The physical surroundings in the cities are often a peril to health…the prevalence of foul air [is among] the many evils to be met."183

Medical Science Speaks:

•             Ozone pollution in urban air causes eye irritation, shortness of breath, cough, worsened lung function, and decreased physical performance.184, 185 

•             Women living in highly polluted regions increase their risk of cancer in proportion to their total exposure to particulate pollutants.186

Exercise is Vital to Health

Ellen White's Words: "The more we exercise, the better will be the circulation of the blood.  More people die for want of exercise than through overfatigue; very many more rust out than wear out.  Those who accustom themselves to proper exercise in the open air will generally have a good and vigorous circulation."187

Medical Science Speaks:

•             Exercise lowers the risk of heart disease.188

•             Exercise lowers the risk of cancer.

•             Exercise benefits physiology in general.

•             Regular exercise promotes longevity.189, 190, 191

 

References
1 Caldwell C. How Trouble Came to Marlboro Country. Wall Street Journal, March,12 1996. Quote from JAMA 1950's.
2 White EG. The Ministry of Healing. Nampa, ID: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 1905 p. 327-328.
3 Henningfield JE, Cohen C, Pickworth WB. Psychopharmacology of nicotine. In: Orleans CT, Slade J, editors. Nicotine Addiction: Principles and Management. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993 p. 27-28.
4 White EG. Tobacco. In: Temperance. Nampa, ID: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 1949 p. 58.
5 US Department of Health and Human Services. The health consequences of smoking: 25 years of progress. A report of the Surgeon General, 1989. Rockville, MD: US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control, Center for Health Promotion and Education, Office on Smoking and Health. DHHS Publication no.(CDC) 89-8411.
6 Henningfield JE, Cohen C, Pickworth WB. Psychopharmacology of nicotine. In: Orleans CT, Slade J, editors. Nicotine Addiction: Principles and Management. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993 p. 24-45.
7 Henningfield JE, Cohen C, Pickworth WB. Psychopharmacology of nicotine. In: Orleans CT, Slade J, editors. Nicotine Addiction: Principles and Management. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993 p. 30-31.
8 White EG. Tobacco. In: Temperance. Nampa, ID: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 1949 p. 58.
9 Epps RP, Manley MW. Clinical Interventions to Prevent Tobacco Use by children and adolescents. In: Glynn TJ, Manley MW. How to Help Your Patients Stop Smoking: A National Cancer Institute Manual for Physicians. National Institutes of Health Publication Number 92-3064. Revised Nov. 1991 p. 63.
10 Henningfield JE, Cohen C, Pickworth WB. Psychopharmacology of nicotine. In: Orleans CT, Slade J, editors. Nicotine Addiction: Principles and Management. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993 p. 30-31.
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23 poster presentation, can check with Dr. Zang.
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197 Numbers 12:6. The Holy Bible. Authorized King James Version.
198 Leviticus 19:31. The Holy Bible. Authorized King James version.
199 Acts 9:3-7. The Holy Bible. Authorized King James version.
200 Loughborough JN. Heavenly Visions. In: Review and Herald, August 1, 1899. As found in: Adventist Pioneer Library. Words of the Pioneers (CD-ROM) Second Edition, 1995.
201 White EG. Counsels on Diet and Foods. Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1976 p. 344.
202 White EG. The Faith I Live By. Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, p. 295.
203 White EG. Selected Messages (Book 1). Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, p. 32.
204 Paul Harvey News, March, 1969.
205 Ellen G. White Estate Branch Office. Andrews University, Berrien Springs, Michigan 49104. http://www.egwestate.andrews.edu/about.egw.html